TIGER ACUPUNCTURE

Sports Medicine & Pain Management

Covered under the Princeton University Student Health Plan

What can I expect for my first  Acupuncture Treatment?

For your Initial Consultation and Treatment, it is preferred that you print and fill out the intake form provided on this website and bring it with you to your appointment. Otherwise, it is advised that you arrive 15 minutes or more prior to your scheduled appointment time to fill out this intake form at reception.

Once your paper work is taken care of at reception, Joseph will review your in depth health history, conduct an extensive interview, as well as perform a physical examination. This physical exam will include listening to your pulse, looking at your tongue, as well as palpating the applicable areas of the body which will help him to determine the proper course of treatment for your complaint.

A large majority of Joseph's patients receive Tui Na (Chinese Medical Massage) in conjunction with Acupuncture. Please refer to the services page for details on this modality.

What type of clothing should I wear for my appointment?

Depending on the condition for which you are seeking treatment, different areas of the body will need to be accessed by your Acupuncturist. It is generally best to wear loose fitting clothing such as athletic pants or shirts. For women, it is also a good idea to bring a tank top so that the Acupuncturist can most easily access your upper/lower back.

Of course, you may arrive at the office in whichever attire is appropriate for the current weather conditions and bring a change of clothes to change into at the time of your appointment.

Is  Acupuncture painful?

Acupuncture is performed with sterile, solid needles that are as thin as a human hair. The sensation of receiving Acupuncture is thus far different than what most patients have experienced when having blood drawn, or when they have received injections from much thicker, and hollow hypodermic needles in a Western Medical setting.

A mild, sharp or burning sensation may be felt when the needles is inserted. This is the sensation of the needles passing through the most superficial layers of skin. This is avoided whenever possible by the practitioner by compressing the skin and inserting the needle quickly to a depth that is less sensitive.

You may feel nothing at the site of where the needle is placed, or you may feel a deep and achy sensation that can also seem to travel in a direction, which is commonly associated with the sensation of Qi in Chinese Medicine.

If you experience any sharpness or burning at the site of the needle after it has been placed, simply let the Acupuncturist know and they will adjust the needle to alleviate this sensation.